Murgh Wajid Ali – from the Royal Kitchens of Awadh

Murgh Wajid Ali
Murgh Wajid Ali

Wajid Ali Shah was the fifth king of Awadh, a princely state in pre- independent India. He was known for his fairy tale palace, patronage of arts, 350 wives, menagerie of tigers and elephants and of course for his royal kitchens.He was an imperial who hand created his own calender. The gourmet cooks of Awadh invented the art of cooking over slow fire. The ambrosial  Awadhi cuisine  consisted of elaborate dishes such as kebabs, kormas, biryanis, exotic breads like warqi paratha, sheermal, naan and delicious desserts which are still popular and relished by people not only in Awadh but also globally.

Murgh Wajid Ali is one of the lesser found recipes from the majestic kitchen. Murgh means chicken.Boneless chicken breasts are flattened and stuffed with khoa ( similar to ricotta cheese )baked and simmered in an aromatic and flavorful gravy. If you get this right I can assure you, you will forget the butter chicken or any other chicken curry. The flavors are delicate ,delectable and easy on the palate.

Before I share the recipe, I would like to thank my family and friends who have been supportive of this blog and have in their own ways kept me motivated. This recipe requires me to mention my brother-in law, anesthesiologist at a leading hospital, who is a fine connoisseur of food, having tasted cuisines from across the world. He has been kind enough to send me information and reading material for the blog when he came to know I was trying this and some other dishes from the Awadhi cuisine.

If you want to feel like a king or a queen for a day, get some one to make this dish , set a royal table layout…and if possible serve it to you with hot flat breads or flavored rice and with all due splendour 🙂

[recipe]

Murgh Wajid Ali

  • Servings: 4
  • Difficulty: medium
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 4 chicken breasts flattened gently
  • 2 tbsp. Ginger garlic paste
  • 2 tbsp. lemon juice
  • 1 tsp. yellow chili powder (or less )
  • salt to taste
  • 1/2 tsp. garam masala (cloves, cardamom, cinnamon)

First step: 

Marinate the chicken with the rest of the ingredients for 15-20 minutes.

Filling Ingredients:

  • 50 g Khoa (Ricotta cheese)
  • 75 g onions chopped
  • 2 green chilies chopped
  • 2 tbsp. cilantro/coriander chopped
  • salt
  • 1 tbsp. lemon juice

Second step:

Mix all the ingredients together and divide into four portions. Spoon one portion on each chicken breast and make a tight roll. Spray a baking sheet with some oil and arrange the stuffed chicken on it. Brush with some oil and cook in the oven at 300º F till done. It should take anywhere between 30-40 minutes.

Gravy ingredients:

  • 3 tbsp. Ghee/oil 
  • 50 g onions chopped
  • 1 tbsp. ginger garlic paste
  •  paste of 8 cashew nuts
  • paste of 25 g desiccated coconut
  • 125 g yogurt
  • 1/4 tsp. garam masala
  • salt
  • a pinch of saffron soaked in 2 tbsp. milk

Third step:

Heat oil in a deep bottomed pan and saute the onions till translucent. Add the ginger garlic paste and the other ingredients one after another.Add some water and cook the gravy on slow fire till oil separates. Slip in the chicken breasts carefully and let simmer till coated with gravy.

Garnish:

  • Almonds
  • Raisins
  • Cilantro/coriander

Last step:

Transfer the chicken along with the thickened gravy into a serving plate and garnish with almonds, raisins and chopped coriander.

Smoke the dish for extra flavor.

Serving suggestions:

  • Serve hot
  • Serve with Indian flat breads, steamed rice, biryani or any flavored rice

wpid-wp-1430372468882.jpeg

wpid-wp-1430372202880.jpeg

Murgh Wajid Ali
Murgh Wajid Ali

Picture of King Wajid Ali Shah:

Washah1

I am taking this royal dish to party with my FF friends. Thank you Angie@TheNoviceGardener for hosting this wonderful event week after week after week. Joining her is a new co-host Anna@AnnaInternational. Come and join me for lots of fun and excitement…

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38 Comments Add yours

  1. 350 wives! Very brave man :). This recipe sounds delicious skd. You’ve created a layer of flavors that are drool worthy. Your brother-in-law is a great culinary resource! It is wonderful when family supports your blogging!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      I know Julie thats an overwhelming experience to have a family which is supportive especially from the in laws side.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Great piece of history integrated in your recipe!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you ☺ Tracing the story behind a dish makes it even more interesting.

      Like

  3. 350 wives??!! That’s a brave, and I’m assuming rich, man!!!!
    The dish looks great – I’ve never heard of yellow chilli powder – can you substitue red chilli powder?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thanks Elaine. I did just that because I couldn’t get hold of the yellow chili powder. But the dish still tastes fabulous.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Okay, thank you 🙂 x

        Liked by 1 person

    2. skd says:

      And yes!! Only a filthy rich man, that too a brave one can handle 350 wives lol

      Liked by 1 person

      1. skd says:

        Haha 😀 Very true!

        Liked by 1 person

  4. Lina says:

    Yummy….every time you turn up with amazing recipes…. So glad this one was posted…can’t wait to try it!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Lina 🙂 That’s real kind of you to say that. Do try it. You will love it….

      Liked by 1 person

  5. The name of this is intimidating to me- but the recipe looks do-able! Thanks for sharing!
    xoxo K
    http://peeledwellness.com

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      The name is taken after the king because he was probably too fond of this dish. i hope it makes you feel better now. Do try the recipe. You will love it.

      Like

  6. Wow ! That’s some good information related to this delicious looking dish ! Haven’t heard of this dish in India , bet the other mughlai dishes are more commercialized!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear ☺.you are so right. I have never come across this dish in restaurants or any where else. I have always wondered how it was missed. But do try it. It is delicious.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I love Mughlai food ! Bookmarking this 🙂 thanks dear 😊

        Liked by 1 person

      2. skd says:

        The pleasure is mine Freda. Thank you ☺

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Sandhya says:

    Great recipe and history too!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much Sandhya ☺

      Like

  8. nitali04 says:

    Great post..so well researched…

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Nitali ☺I am so glad you like it.

      Liked by 1 person

  9. andy says:

    uffff !!! this looks a killer !! 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Melt in the mouth succulent and delicately flavored. Thanks Andy☺

      Liked by 1 person

  10. Arl's World says:

    Wow!! This looks amazing! Thanks for sharing! Happy FF my friend! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Arl ☺ Happy FF to you too

      Liked by 1 person

  11. Love the history- adds so much to the dish! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much Josette. I am glad you enjoyed it.

      Like

  12. Dana says:

    ALL THE THINGS YUM!!!! I know its still the morning but I tell you., I feel like I can smell this and I want it and I am o hungry and the cup of tea I have at the moment is far from a royal kitchen! haha I need this, pleaseeeeee Skd, cook for me!
    Dropping in to leave my dosage of love and tokens of good vibes
    wishing you the best day, xx
    Dana | http://booquepress.com

    Like

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Dana☺ I am always in need of this dosage and token of good vibes from you my dear friend. If only you were close by you wouldn’t have had to even tell me . I would have parceled your share to you💞☺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dana says:

        yesssssssss! I need to obviously relocate soon! hahawishing you a great Friday and weekend
        x

        Liked by 1 person

      2. skd says:

        The pleasure will be mine. Besides awesome bites, i can get awesome style tips from you 🙂 Enjoy your weekend too.

        Liked by 1 person

  13. Thanks for the history lesson along with the recipe and beautiful images.

    Like

  14. Janice Wald says:

    Hi,
    1. I teach history.
    2. Thank you for visiting my site Reflections today; I am glad you liked my new StumbleUpon post. Nice to meet you.
    Janice

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you ☺Nice to meet you too. I found your blog very interesting. I would love to go back and read each of them in detail soon.
      Regards
      skd

      Like

  15. Miia says:

    Wow, this looks delicious. I am planning to make Indian this weekend, so may try this. Moreover, thanks for the introduction of the Awadh state, it was not familiar to me.
    Ps Happy new year!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much Miia!! Indian cuisine is rich in its flavors and spices. Every part of the country has its own cultural heritage and history which has influenced its regional cuisine. Awadhi cuisine is less spicy and easy on the palate. You will love this dish. Please do try 👍☺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Miia says:

        Long time I haven’t had Indian food, miss it!!
        Your food heritage is truly amazing, I am always so impressed where I go in India. Unfortunately difficult to find varied, regional Indian cuisine abroad.. at least in Paris.

        Like

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