Hyderabadi Haleem – Two versions:Traditional Mutton haleem and a Healthier Oats haleem for a Rare Recipe Challenge

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Haleem is a traditional and royal dish of Hyderabad- the enchanting land of Nizams.Originally an Arabic dish, it was brought to Hyderabad centuries ago during the rule of the seventh Nizam and soon got it’s own local version which has become immensely popular world wide.  It is usually made in huge quantities in bhattis (cauldrons) and cooked on slow fire over firewood for 10-12 hours. Though Haleem is available round the year in restaurants and served as a delicacy during Hyderabadi weddings, it is synonymous with the holy month of Ramadan. Almost every street in the entire city of Hyderabad has a haleem kiosk during the fasting month of Ramadan. Delicious, nutritious haleem is cooked whole day and ready to be served at sunset when the fast is broken. It is relished by people of all religions and ages, whether or not they are fasting.

Pic courtesy:Google
Haleem kiosk during Ramadan                         Pic courtesy:Google

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When  Lin@Lin’s Recipes  threw a Rare Recipe Challenge and wanted someone to take up haleem, I couldn’t let it pass by. Because Hyderabad is my hometown and haleem is a favorite. Lin is an amazing food blogger and writer who presents her recipes in a novel way (pun intended). She keeps posting interesting challenges and this is one of them. Our dear old Jhuls@thenotsocreativecook happens to be our judge. She is one of the most creative cooks around and her recipes are fabulous. Do check out her yummy blog for a mouth watering display of food. And please do not forget to check out other interesting and rare recipes in the challenge.

Hyderabadi haleem now has its vegetarian,sweet and healthy variations. It is made with lamb/beef/chicken/fish/emu meats. but the traditional version popular in Hyderabad is the one made with lamb meat. I am posting two versions of Haleem- the traditional one and a healthier one with oats.

The healthier version recipe is my aunt-inlaw’s. She makes some amazing Hyderabadi dishes. She recently sent me a box of delicious haleem made with chicken and oats and I took the recipe from her. I will be posting that one too. Do try both the recipes and let me know which one you like.

Hyderabadi Haleem- Traditional version

  • Servings: 6-8
  • Difficulty: hard
  • Print

Ingredients:

  • 1 kg  boneless mutton pieces
  •  200g broken/cracked Wheat
  • 1 heaped tbsp. ginger garlic paste 
  • 1 cup Urad daal (de-husked black lentil)
  • 1 cup Chana daal (split bengal gram)  
  • 300 ml. Curds(yogurt)
  • 1 tsp. Red chilli powder
  • 1/2 tsp. Turmeric powder
  • 1 tsp. coriander seeds powder
  • 1/2 tsp. garam masala powder
  • 1/4 tsp. cumin seeds powder
  • 4 medium onions, sliced fine
  •  3 whole cardamoms
  • one 3 inch cinnamon stick
  • 4 whole cloves
  • 8 black peppercons
  • 1/2 cup fresh coriander leaves
  • 1/2 cup fresh mint leaves
  • 4 green chillies
  • 1 tomato, chopped fine
  • 1 tbsp. Ghee+ 1/2 tsp. red chilli powder for garnish
  • salt to taste
  • fried cashewnuts for sprinkling
  • 1/2 cup vegetable oil

Method:

  1. Rinse and soak broken wheat and both lentils (urad and chana) in 10 cups water for 4-5 hours.
  2. In a heavy bottomed vessel, pour 1/2 cup oil and fry the onions until they turn crisp and golden brown.
  3. Add cardamom, cinnamon and cloves to the fried onions and fry them for a minute.
  4. Next add mutton pieces in to the vessel.  Add turmeric powder, red chilli powder and saute well till oil separates. Add two glasses of water. Cover and leave to cook until mutton is tender. You can alternatively cook it in a pressure cooker for faster cooking.
  5. When the meat is tender shred it with the back of a spoon and/or a fork.
  6. Season with  salt, coriander powder, garam masala and cumin powder. Add green chillies,  coriander leaves,  mint leaves, chopped tomato, yogurt and a cup of water. Mix well and put the vessel back on heat.
  7. Cover lid and cook for another 15-20 minutes till oil separates.
  8. In another vessel, add soaked broken wheat, urad and chana dal mixture along with the water, 1/2 tsp. salt, peppercons and a pinch of turmeric powder and cook covered on medium flame for 15-20 minutes. Keep stirring  as the mixture can stick to the bottom.Add water if needed.
  9. When the mixture becomes very soft and pasty. Turn off heat.
  10. Add the shredded mutton along with the yogurt and spice mixture. Mix and mash well with a wooden spoon.
  11. Turn on the stove and cook the mixture on low flame for one hour while stirring  every 2 minutes.
  12. In a small pan put the ghee and turn on low heat. Add 1/2 tsp. red chilli powder and turn off heat. Keep separately for garnish.

How to serve:

Ladle in a cup of haleem in an individual serving plate and put a teaspoon of the spiced ghee over it. Garnish with some fried onions, a lemon wedge and some cashews. Serve hot.

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crisp fried onions
crisp fried onions

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Haleem being cooked on low heat on stove top

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Oats and Chicken Haleem

  • Servings: 4-6
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print

Ingredients for step 1:

  • 3 cups broken wheat
  • 1/3 cup Oats
  • 1/3 cup Chana daal (split bengal gram)
  • 1/3 cup Urad daal (de-husked black lentil)
  • 12 green chillies
  • 1 bunch Coriander leaves chopped
  • 1 bunch mint leaves chopped
  • 2 tsp. ginger garlic paste

Put all these ingredients in a pressure cooker with enough water and cook on high heat for 5 minutes and on low heat for an hour. Remove from heat and mash with the back of a wooden spoon or a wooden masher.

Ingredients for step 2:

  • 1/2 cup oil
  • 4 onions sliced
  • 1 tbsp. ginger garlic paste
  • 2 tbsp. dry coconut ground to a paste
  • 1 tbsp. peanut paste
  • 8 almonds ground to a paste
  • 1 tsp. kababchini powder(tailed pepper)
  • 1 tsp. garam masala
  • 1 tsp. red chilli powder
  • 1 and 1/4 cup yogurt
  • 1 and 1/4 kg. chicken
  • salt to taste
  • juice of 1 lemon
  • crisp fried onions for garnish

In a deep bottom vessel, put oil and fry the onions till golden. Then saute the ginger garlic paste. Add the coconut,peanut,almond pastes one by one. Saute till oil separates. Add red chilli powder, kababchini powder,garam masala,salt,yogurt and chicken. Saute well. Add a glass of water,cover and cook till chicken is tender. Remove from heat and separate the bones and shred the chicken with the help of a fork. Discard the bones.

Add the wheat and oats mixture and mix well. Put the vessel on low heat for 20 minutes stirring all the while.Add lemon juice and take off heat.

Serve hot with fried onions,lemon wedges and some mint.

Enjoy…

Hyderabad fondly known as the ‘Pearl City’ is an enchanting land of heritage monuments,forts,palaces, lakes, museums, gardens, software parks and more importantly a delectable cuisine fit for the kings. The once princely state was a kingdom of the wealthy and powerful Qutubshahi and Asafjahi rulers. The relics of their glorious rule can still be seen all over the city. Hyderabad has now emerged as the seat of India’s mighty Software dynasty. but what is remarkable about this city is that it has not lost  its princely charm while catering to the city’s new royalty. Hyderabadi food even today can boast of the aristocratic touch.

 

Do try some more interesting recipes from the wonderful land of Hyderabad:

Marag

Delicious Hyderabadi Lamb stew
Delicious Hyderabadi Lamb stew

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Dum ka Murgh

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Hyderabadi Fish curry

Hyderabadi Fish curry
Hyderabadi Fish curry

 

 

 

 

 

 

Khoobani ka Meetha

Apricot sweet
Apricot sweet

 

 

 

 

 

 

Enjoy these yummy dishes while i take my two versions of haleem to Lin’s Rare recipe challenge…..

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108 Comments Add yours

  1. Lina says:

    I would mind trying both the versions…xD..I have been searching like crazy for a traditional Haleem recipe for ages and ages! Now that I have it I just want to scream! What a wonderful contribution! You are the best! I am so glad to have you as a part..I love everything in this post from the pictures to the recipe to the healthier version of it! You are absolutely marvelous!

    Liked by 4 people

    1. skd says:

      I am so happy to be a part of your challenge dear Lin. Enjoying every bit of it. Thank you for having me on 👍☺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Lina says:

        My pleasure!

        Like

    2. skd says:

      And thank you for all the kind words ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  2. Ana, just wonderful my dear friend!!! Cheryl x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Cheryl. I’m so glad you like it ☺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Wonderful simply delightful!!! x

        Like

  3. It looks hearty and wonderful. Hugs.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much Teagan 💕

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Very well written and an elaborate post darling 🙂 love it

    Liked by 3 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Trupti. You are so kind 💕

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I wrote to you what was true 🙂 I mean every bit of it

        Liked by 1 person

      2. skd says:

        Aww…thank you dear friend 😊💕

        Liked by 1 person

  5. Beautiful, SKD! Halim, we call it in Farsi, is a VERY popular comfort food for the Persians. I have a friend who makes halim after Thanksgiving, using all the bones for its stock and the leftover turkey meat, It is marvelous. Have seen many halims, I must say, both yours look heavenly! I don’t know why, it is the last thing I imagined to see on a blog. 😀 )))
    Yum!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Wow! Thank you dear Fae for your kind words. It made my day. Does Haleem in Farsi mean ‘patience ‘ . I read somewhere that the lengthy and tiresome process of making haleem in huge cauldrons requires lot of patience and hence it got it’s name. I am not sure though. Are the spices used in Persian haleem are different from the Hyderabadi version. Would love to learn the Persian Haleem recipe too.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Most probably the recipe varies from region to region. I have never made it myself, but based on what I have observed and partook, basic Persian recipe has far less ingredients than Hyderabadi version you have here. Same method for ingredients: meat: lamb, veal, beef, chicken or turkey, onion(s), soaked whole wheat, salt. For garnish, melted butter is drizzled on top sprinkled with cinnamon and sugar. I am one of minority who does not like this sweet garnish. I prefer having plain or with a few drops of lemon juice, which is apparently unusual. As for the word ‘haleem’, I am not sure… most probably we inherited the Arabic word.

        Liked by 1 person

  6. Each of these versions sound wonderful — I love lamb, and yes, oats. Definitely, I think I can sense the aromas through my wi-fi…

    Liked by 3 people

    1. skd says:

      I so wish we can download food. Will never be impressed with technology till then😉 Thank you dear for the kind words ☺

      Like

  7. Sandhya says:

    Ana, I have been craving Haleem for days- feel that it is perfect in the winter! I love both your recipes. Love seeing Hyderabad and the information and history of Haleem is fascinating! Thanks for sharing.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Sandhya for liking it. Have you tasted haleem before. You must visit Hyderabad during Ramadan. It will be an amazing and delicious experience !!!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Sandhya says:

        I have not tasted the ‘authentic’ haleem, Ana. I would love to visit Hyderabad during Ramadan. I have heard so many wonderful an delicious stories about it!

        Liked by 1 person

      2. skd says:

        Please do. I will take you on a haleem trail ☺

        Like

  8. I’ve never had Haleem before it sounds and looks delicious. Both recipes are wonderful and your information about Hyperabad is so interesing,

    Liked by 4 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Suzanne! Haleem is as popular as the Hyderabadi Biryani. It is a gastronomers delight!!

      Liked by 1 person

  9. Got this memorised. Will be making this weekend. Thank you my friend!!! (you just made Saturday night easier ) x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      You are amazing Shehanne ☺ Lots of hugs and regards 💕

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I am not as amazing as you my darling xxxxx

        Like

  10. Lovely Share!!! Love both the recipes:))

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much ☺

      Like

  11. Fazal says:

    I like the dish very much.My grand son too enjoys it.It is an important dish at the time breaking fast (iftar)
    during Ramzan

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      If you and your grandson come over to my place I will gladly make it for you 😉

      Like

  12. Jhuls says:

    Wow! What a wonderful choice, Ana. I never heard or tried this kind of dish before. I love that you made your introduction of the dish first and I love that you have two versions, though I know both of them sound fabulously good. 😀 Haleem sounds like a very flavorful dish and very aromatic – yum!

    Hyderabad seems like a lovely place and I’d love to visit one day.
    Thank you for taking part at Rare Recipe Challenge. Looking forward to more delicious recipes. 😀

    x Jhuls

    PS: Thank you so much for your kind words. x

    Liked by 3 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much for liking it dear Jhuls. It is very nutritious and energising. That is why it is very popular as an Iftar dish during Ramadan. The best part is no one needs to make it at home during the fasting month. Every street has a haleem vendor. They make it with pure Ghee, lamb meat and dry fruits. The process of making it in large cauldrons for 8 to 12 hours results in the most delicious, melt in the mouth, flavorful dish ever. Then the haleem is washed down with tea before proceeding for prayers. Beautiful beautiful experience in all.

      Liked by 1 person

    2. skd says:

      And please do visit Hyderabad. You will love the warmth and laziness around besides enjoying delicious food.If you let me know in advance I will drop in from wherever I am and would gladly be your tour guide 😊

      Like

  13. Gloria says:

    Have tasted it during my stay in Hyderabad. Yours is superb and excellent. Thank you for sharing this beautiful recipe.

    Liked by 3 people

    1. skd says:

      Oh Wow! Did you try during Ramadan. It tastes the best during the season. Thank you for liking the recipe Gloria ☺👍

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Gloria says:

        yes skd. I tried it during the month of Ramadan for the first time. Boy! how I loved it. The taste still lingers in my mouth and I miss Hyderabad for this.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. skd says:

        Then you must plan a trip soon. 👍☺

        Liked by 1 person

  14. The traditional version sure looks good – love the fried onions on top 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Judi. I’m happy you like it . The fried onions are a compulsory topping to Haleem.☺

      Like

  15. It looks so creamy and delicious, (I have the preference with the mutton version), SKD. Thanks for sharing the video, Love the music! 🙂 xx

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Linda ☺ You must see the demand for haleem during Ramadan. Almost 90% of people who are fasting break their fast with dates and Haleem. Mutton haleem is the most popular. People who cannot fit it in their budget for 30 days eat Chicken or beef haleem. And you know I have seen a few kiosks selling Emu meat haleem.

      Liked by 1 person

  16. Great to learn about the dish, it’s new to me 🙂 your versions look amazing x

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Elaine ☺ Nowadays they make a vegetarian haleem as well which is becoming popular with the vegetarians.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. That sounds very interesting…what vegetables would you use?

        Like

      2. skd says:

        Cauliflower, white pumpkin, potato, carrot, French beans, and broccoli are mostly used as substitutes for meat while the spices remain the same. I haven’t prepared it so far but would love to do that soon.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. Ooh yes, please do, I’d love to see it 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      4. skd says:

        I will try Elaine, just for you. I know you love vegetarian food. Are you purely vegetarian or do you eat meats some times.

        Liked by 1 person

      5. 100% vegetarian. I don’t eat any meat or fish ever.
        Thank you 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

  17. Hari Qhuang says:

    Glorious! Glorious!! 😀
    The herbs, the spices! Such rich culinary and culture!

    Liked by 3 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much for the kind words.Hyderabad is known for its royal heritage and culinary extravaganza. Haleem is as popular as the Hyderabadi Biryani. And relished not only by the locals but tourists make it a point to try these two dishes before leaving Hyderabad.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Hari Qhuang says:

        I find that foods cooked with herbs and spices always have a story to tell, and philosophy to teach.

        The Haleem reminds me of Indonesian “Rendang”, in the sense of its popularity and its richness of cultural and culinary values. 🙂

        Liked by 1 person

      2. skd says:

        Rendang!! Oh wow!! Would love to try it.
        Knowing the story behind a dish makes it a whole some and amazing experience.

        Liked by 1 person

      3. skd says:

        How interesting!! I will look for the recipe. I will love to find out why it was her favorite and how different it is from the other Wings recipes. It must be really good. Thanks for letting me know. I have still not forgotten the spooky tale of a village you had narrated☺

        Liked by 1 person

      4. Hari Qhuang says:

        I hope you find the recipe soon! 😀

        Liked by 1 person

  18. srividhya says:

    Hyderabadi version sounds amazing. Great clicks. I had the same thing too. Found Hyderabadi version of paneer pasanday. I should try that too.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Vidhya!! Paneer Pasanday is a delicious dish with subtle flavors . I have tried it in a restaurant. Have not made it at home as yet.

      Like

  19. lsbanu says:

    This is fantastic! Love Haleem. So far I have only made it with the Shan mix. Excited to try these!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Shan mix gives you the Pakistani version of Haleem I presume. Please do try this Hyderabadi one also. Requires some patience but turns out delicious 👌☺

      Liked by 1 person

  20. Nandini says:

    You haleem looks really good…Yum! yum!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Nandini. It is very filling and nutritious. ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  21. Wow! That looks amazing!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  22. I have never heard of this until now. This looks so interesting! Thank you.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Haleem is a traditional dish of Hyderabad. Takes a bit of effort but very flavorful and delicious. A complete meal in itself. Thank you for liking it ☺ 👍

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Thank you for posting about it. It is something I would have otherwise never heard of!

        Liked by 1 person

  23. A lovely post, looks amazing!!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Lynz. You must have tasted the Arabic haleem.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. I have and I would love to make this version with no meat. I am not a big fan of lamb as I didn’t grow up eating it. This sounds really lovely!!!

        Liked by 1 person

  24. Loretta says:

    Oh these two Haleem dishes from Hyderbad are just mouth-watering Ana. The gravy looks so lush and tempting. I can only imagine what the end result must have been. Gorgeous! Loved the history to it too.

    Liked by 1 person

  25. ChgoJohn says:

    What a great post! Not only did I learn 2 recipes but a bit about their point of origin, as well. Thanks for today’s lesson.

    Liked by 1 person

  26. davegon says:

    Wow. I really like the look of it–it looks so satisfying! And I bet really tasty with garlic, cumin, cardamom. Thanks for the info, too!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much for liking it. There are so many spices which combine to bring a delicate flavor to the dish without overpowering it. A complete heart warming dish it is.

      Liked by 1 person

  27. Both the versions of your Haleem look absolutely delicious!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Freda☺

      Liked by 1 person

  28. Nancy says:

    Great post, skd… I love learning about “new to me” foods and this certainly falls into that category! The dishes look hearty and delicious and I’m guessing prepared with love! Delightful!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much Nancy ☺ 💕

      Like

  29. So cool!! I have always wanted to try Haleem and I did not know that it could be made with oats!! Awesome

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much ☺ Please do try it in leisure.

      Like

  30. Great post! It was very informative and a great read!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you dear Nell. I am so happy you liked it ☺

      Like

  31. I love Haleem thank you so much for sharing!!! Such a great winter recipe, will definitely try soon 🙂

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much for liking it ☺ Is there an Afghani version of haleem. Do you make it! !

      Liked by 1 person

      1. No we don’t have this dish, so it is always a treat when a friend prepares it 😉

        Liked by 1 person

  32. tentimestea says:

    How lovely that this recipe came from your hometown! Hyderabad looks beautiful (and all the different dishes you shared sound delicious). I love the two different versions (it’s such a versatile dish!), and just looking at the ingredients list is enough to convince me how incredible it must taste!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you so much for liking it. You should see the fan following it has.They keep coming up with a new version every year. Last year it was with Emu ☺

      Liked by 1 person

      1. tentimestea says:

        Hahaha! So much creativity!

        Like

  33. Arohii says:

    Hi Ana 🙂
    I nominated you for two awards, please check this post- https://goo.gl/LU6fZ8
    Hope you are fine.
    Take care~~xo

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Hey Arohi !!! Thank you so much for nominating me. Double Dhamaka🎉🎉🎉🎉💕I am humbled and overwhelmed dear. Lots of love sending your way💝

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Arohii says:

        🙂 My pleasure, well deserved Awards Ana. Tons of love and best wishes, xx

        Liked by 1 person

  34. sabaah says:

    Hi the haleem looks really yummy, I have another version on my blog a Mauritian one since I was born in Mauritius I learnt it from my Mum. I Will try this version soon

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Sabaah for the kind words. I would love to check out the Mauritian version too. Thanks for stopping by and also for the like ☺👍

      Like

  35. pennross says:

    If I ever get to India, I think I would gain a ton of weight! I have tried the oats and chicken but not with all the ingredients you’ve listed. Thank you for your wonderful blog!!

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you for the kind words ☺ If we eat this kind of every day. ..yes it is easy to gain a ton 😉But they are kept for special occasions. But don’t keep yourself from visiting India. You will love the diversity in cultures and cuisines.There are 29 states in India and each one has its own rich cultural heritage and local cuisine.

      Liked by 1 person

  36. LFFL says:

    Omg, I’m just amazed by all the spices that are used! I love spices. Sounds awesome.

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Thank you Cita 🙂

      Like

  37. Haleem….its a very typical recipe….my husband is die hearted fan….omg……but i never tasted it before…. All are so crazy about bit…. During ramadan….,every day they must go for it…..you made this recipe!!!!!!!?….. Omg you are amazing…😊☺️👌👌👌👌👌👍👍👍💐💐🌹👏

    Liked by 2 people

    1. skd says:

      Aww…thank you so much. Ramadan is round the corner and we can all look forward to yummy haleem again ☺

      Liked by 1 person

  38. Kiki says:

    Love Hyderabadi cuisine! Best food ever.. you might also enjoy my recipe here: https://ankithagadag.wordpress.com/2016/09/15/hyderabadi-achari-murgh/

    Liked by 1 person

  39. soulcurry says:

    Reblogged this on soulcurry.

    Liked by 1 person

  40. nancyc says:

    This looks great! I’ve been trying to “like” some of your more recent posts, but for some reason, the ‘Like” button won’t work for me and I haven’t been able to make comments. Must be something from my end, since it looks like other people are able to!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. skd says:

      Thanks a lot Nancy. WordPress is having some technical issues of late. Every time something like that happens I reinstall the app.

      Like

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